Alexander “Graham” was...

Alexander “Graham” was not added until he was 11, was born to Alexander Melville Bell and Eliza Grace Symonds. His mother was almost deaf, and his father taught the deaf, influencing Alexander’s later career as a teacher of the deaf. At age 11 he entered Royal High School at Edinburgh, but he didn’t enjoy the compulsory curriculum, and he left school at age 15 without graduating. Alexander passed the entrance examinations for University College London in 1868 and matriculated there in the Autumn. However, he did not complete his studies, because in 1870 the Bell family moved again, this time immigrating to Canada after the deaths of Bell’s younger brother Edward in 1867 and older brother Melville in 1870, both of tuberculosis.
Alexander Graham Bell’s mother, Eliza Bell, is a hearing impaired. Her father, Melville Bell, is an actor and a programmer named the visual speech that uses symbols to teach people how to talk in tongues they have never heard before. Alexander Graham Bell was interested in hearing impairment, and he started teaching his father’s business through a variety of schools for the deaf. After American educators visited the German language school in the 1840s, they did not overcome networks and signed teachers. However, in the 1870s, Bell began to promote oral education for hearing impaired people.
Even though Alexander Graham Bell worked in Boston he was born in Edinburgh, Scotland. When he was born he didn’t have a middle name, he was known as Alexander Bell. Alex, as he was called did not attend school as a child, he was homeschooled by his mother. As he got older she started to believe she had taught him everything he could teach him, so she sent him to start a regular life. Alexander wasn’t a really good student but he enjoyed doing experiments and discovering new things.
He is well known for inventing the telephone. He came to the U.S as a teacher to the deaf and conceived the idea of “electronic speech” while visiting his hearing-impaired mother in Canada. This led him to invent the microphone and later the “electrical speech machine” -- his name for the first telephone he created. He inspired Berliner to create a telephone also, which included an improved microphone, which increased the volume of the transmitted voice. Berliner then sold his telephone to The Bell Telephone Company and he gained employment there, as a research assistant.